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Mult Scler. 2016 May;22(6):830-41. doi: 10.1177/1352458515599450. Epub 2015 Aug 3.

Validating Neuro-QoL short forms and targeted scales with people who have multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Mellen Center, Cleveland Clinic, USA millerd@ccf.org.
2
Mellen Center, Cleveland Clinic, USA.
3
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA.
4
Office of Clinical Research, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling disease of the central nervous system with dramatic variations in the combination and severity of symptoms it can produce. The lack of reliable disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures for use in clinical trials prompted the development of the Neurology Quality of Life (Neuro-QOL) instrument, which includes 13 scales that assess physical, emotional, cognitive, and social domains, for use in a variety of neurological illnesses.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this research paper is to conduct an initial assessment of the reliability and validation of the Neuro-QOL short forms (SFs) in MS.

METHODS:

We assessed reliability, concurrent validity, known groups validity, and responsiveness between cross-sectional and longitudinal data in 161 recruited MS patients.

RESULTS:

Internal consistency was high for all measures (α = 0.81-0.95) and ICCs were within the acceptable range (0.76-0.91); concurrent and known groups validity were highest with the Global HRQL question. Longitudinal assessment was limited by the lack of disease progression in the group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Neuro-QOL SFs demonstrate good internal consistency, test-re-test reliability, and concurrent and known groups validity in this MS population, supporting the validity of Neuro-QOL in adults with MS.

KEYWORDS:

Neuro-QOL; health-related quality of life; multiple sclerosis; patient-reported outcomes

PMID:
26238464
PMCID:
PMC4740288
DOI:
10.1177/1352458515599450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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