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Dev Cell. 2015 Aug 24;34(4):421-34. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2015.06.012. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

Cadherin Switch during EMT in Neural Crest Cells Leads to Contact Inhibition of Locomotion via Repolarization of Forces.

Author information

1
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
2
Centre de Biologie du Développement-UMR5547, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse 31400, France.
3
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK; Centre de Biologie du Développement-UMR5547, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse 31400, France.
4
Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics, Kings College London, London SE11UL, UK.
5
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: r.mayor@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is the process through which cells move away from each other after cell-cell contact, and it contributes to malignant invasion and developmental migration. Various cell types exhibit CIL, whereas others remain in contact after collision and may form stable junctions. To investigate what determines this differential behavior, we study neural crest cells, a migratory stem cell population whose invasiveness has been likened to cancer metastasis. By comparing pre-migratory and migratory neural crest cells, we show that the switch from E- to N-cadherin during EMT is essential for acquisition of CIL behavior. Loss of E-cadherin leads to repolarization of protrusions, via p120 and Rac1, resulting in a redistribution of forces from intercellular tension to cell-matrix adhesions, which break down the cadherin junction. These data provide insight into the balance of physical forces that contributes to CIL in cells in vivo.

PMID:
26235046
PMCID:
PMC4552721
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2015.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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