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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2015 Sep;56:330-44. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.07.014. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

Resting-state functional connectivity in major depressive disorder: A review.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Huispost 961, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Neuroscience, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: petercr.mulders@radboudumc.nl.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Huispost 961, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Neuroscience, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: philip.vaneijndhoven@radboudumc.nl.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Huispost 961, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Neuroscience, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: aart.schene@radboudumc.nl.
4
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Neuroscience, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.beckmann@fcdonders.ru.nl.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Huispost 961, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Neuroscience, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Essen, Virchowstraße 174, 45147 Essen, Germany. Electronic address: indira.tendolkar@radboudumc.nl.

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects multiple large-scale functional networks in the brain, which has initiated a large number of studies on resting-state functional connectivity in depression. We review these recent studies using either seed-based correlation or independent component analysis and propose a model that incorporates changes in functional connectivity within current hypotheses of network-dysfunction in MDD. Although findings differ between studies, consistent findings include: (1) increased connectivity within the anterior default mode network, (2) increased connectivity between the salience network and the anterior default mode network, (3) changed connectivity between the anterior and posterior default mode network and (4) decreased connectivity between the posterior default mode network and the central executive network. These findings correspond to the current understanding of depression as a network-based disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Central executive network; Default mode network; Functional connectivity; Independent component analysis; Major depressive disorder; Salience network; Seed-based correlation analysis

PMID:
26234819
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.07.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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