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Am J Prev Med. 2015 Dec;49(6):850-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.05.025. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

Grip Strength as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes in Healthy Weight Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Health Services Research, Management, and Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida;. Electronic address: arch.mainous@ufl.edu.
2
Department of Health Services Research, Management, and Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
3
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Muscle strength may play a role in cardiometabolic disease. We examined the relationship between hand grip strength and diabetes and hypertension in a sample of healthy weight adults.

METHODS:

In 2015, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012 for adults aged ≥20 years with healthy BMIs (between 18.5 and <25) and no history of cardiovascular disease (unweighted n=1,467; weighted n=61,587,139). Hand grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. Diabetes was based on hemoglobin A1c level and reported diabetes diagnosis. Hypertension was based on measured blood pressure and reported hypertension diagnosis.

RESULTS:

Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes had lower grip strength (51.9 vs 69.8, p=0.0001), as did individuals with diagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes (61.7 vs 69.8, p=0.008). Mean grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension compared with individuals without hypertension (63.5 vs 71.5, p=0.008) as well as among individuals with diagnosed hypertension compared with those without hypertension (60.8 vs 71.5, p<0.0001). In adjusted analyses controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status, and first-degree relative with disease, mean grip strength was lower for undiagnosed diabetes (β=-10.02, p<0.0001) and diagnosed diabetes (β=-8.21, p=0.03) compared with individuals without diabetes. In adjusted analyses, grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension (β=-6.6, p=0.004) and diagnosed hypertension (β=-4.27, p=0.04) compared with individuals without hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among healthy weight adults, combined grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension.

PMID:
26232901
PMCID:
PMC4656117
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2015.05.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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