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Tree Physiol. 2015 Oct;35(10):1062-74. doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpv068. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Fertilization with urea, ammonium and nitrate produce different effects on growth, hydraulic traits and drought tolerance in Pinus taeda seedlings.

Author information

1
Instituto de Fisiología Vegetal (CONICET-UNLP), Diag 113 No. 495 (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina Present address: INTA EEA Delta del Paraná, CC 14 (2804), Campana, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Instituto de Fisiología Vegetal (CONICET-UNLP), Diag 113 No. 495 (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
3
Instituto de Fisiología Vegetal (CONICET-UNLP), Diag 113 No. 495 (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina corinagraciano@agro.unlp.edu.ar.

Abstract

Urea fertilization decreases Pinus taeda L. growth in clay soils of subtropical areas. The negative effect of urea is related to changes in some hydraulic traits, similar to those observed in plants growing under drought. The aims of this work were (i) to determine whether different sources of nitrogen applied as fertilizers produce similar changes in growth and hydraulic traits to those observed by urea fertilization and (ii) to analyze the impact of those changes in plant drought tolerance. Plants fertilized with urea, nitrate [Formula: see text] or ammonium [Formula: see text] were grown well watered or with reduced water supply. Urea and [Formula: see text] fertilization reduced plant growth and increased root hydraulic conductance scaled by root dry weight (DW). [Formula: see text] fertilization did not reduce plant growth and increased shoot hydraulic conductance and stem hydraulic conductivity. We conclude that [Formula: see text] is the ion involved in the changes linked to the negative effect of urea fertilization on P. taeda growth. [Formula: see text] fertilization does not change drought susceptibility and it produces changes in shoot hydraulic traits, therefore plants avoid the depressive effect of fertilization. Urea and [Formula: see text] fertilizers induce changes in DW and root hydraulic conductance and consequently plants are less affected by drought.

KEYWORDS:

allocation; dry weight; fertilizer; hydraulic conductance; hydraulic conductivity; nitrogen

PMID:
26232784
DOI:
10.1093/treephys/tpv068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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