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Microb Pathog. 2015 Nov;88:1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2015.07.018. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

Antigen I/II encoded by integrative and conjugative elements of Streptococcus agalactiae and role in biofilm formation.

Author information

1
INRA, UMR1128 DynAMic, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France; Université de Lorraine, UMR1128 DynAMic, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France; ANSES Site de Lyon, Unité Antibiorésistance et Virulence Bactériennes, Lyon, France.
2
Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biologie des Bactéries Pathogènes à Gram-Positif, Paris, France; CNRS ERL3526, Paris, France.
3
ANSES Site de Lyon, Unité Antibiorésistance et Virulence Bactériennes, Lyon, France.
4
INRA, UMR1128 DynAMic, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France; Université de Lorraine, UMR1128 DynAMic, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. Electronic address: sophie.payot@nancy.inra.fr.

Abstract

Streptococcus agalactiae (i.e. Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a major human and animal pathogen. Genes encoding putative surface proteins and in particular an antigen I/II have been identified on Integrative and Conjugative Elements (ICEs) found in GBS. Antigens I/II are multimodal adhesins promoting colonization of the oral cavity by streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans. The prevalence and diversity of antigens I/II in GBS were studied by a bioinformatic analysis. It revealed that antigens I/II, which are acquired by horizontal transfer via ICEs, exhibit diversity and are widespread in GBS, in particular in the serotype Ia/ST23 invasive strains. This study aimed at characterizing the impact on GBS biology of proteins encoded by a previously characterized ICE of S. agalactiae (ICE_515_tRNA(Lys)). The production and surface exposition of the antigen I/II encoded by this ICE was examined using RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments. Surface proteins of ICE_515_tRNA(Lys) were found to contribute to GBS biofilm formation and to fibrinogen binding. Contribution of antigen I/II encoded by SAL_2056 to biofilm formation was also demonstrated. These results highlight the potential for ICEs to spread microbial adhesins between species.

KEYWORDS:

Adhesion; Antigen I/II; Biofilm; Fibrinogen; GBS; ICE

PMID:
26232503
DOI:
10.1016/j.micpath.2015.07.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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