Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Sep;242(1):243-50. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.06.057. Epub 2015 Jul 7.

Relationship of the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio to the remainder of the lipid profile: The Very Large Database of Lipids-4 (VLDL-4) study.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jquispe1@jhmi.edu.
2
Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Preventive Cardiology, CGH Medical Center, Sterling, IL, USA; University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, IL, USA.
4
Atherotech Diagnostics Lab, Birmingham, AL, USA.
5
Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA; South Beach Preventive Cardiology Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
6
Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Section of Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
7
Department of Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High levels of the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio are associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance.

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated variability in the remaining lipid profile, especially remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol (RLP-C) and its components (very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol subfraction 3 and intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol), with variability in the TG/HDL-C ratio in a very large study cohort representative of the general U.S.

METHODS:

We examined data from 1,350,908 US individuals who were clinically referred for lipoprotein cholesterol ultracentrifugation (Atherotech, Birmingham, AL) from 2009 to 2011. Demographic information other than age and sex was not available. Changes to the remaining lipid profile across percentiles of the TG/HDL-C ratio were quantified, as well as by three TG/HDL-C cut-off points previously proposed in the literature: 2.5 (male) and 2 (female), 3.75 (male) and 3 (female), and 3.5 (male and female).

RESULTS:

The mean age of our study population was 58.7 years, and 48% were men. The median TG/HDL-C ratio was 2.2. Across increasing TG/HDL-C ratios, we found steadily increasing levels of RLP-C, non-HDL-C and LDL density. Among the lipid parameters studied, RLP-C and LDL density had the highest relative increase when comparing individuals with elevated TG/HDL-C levels to those with lower TG/HDL-C levels using established cut-off points. Approximately 47% of TG/HDL-C ratio variance was attributable to RLP-C.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the present analysis, a higher TG/HDL-C ratio was associated with an increasingly atherogenic lipid phenotype, characterized by higher RLP-C along with higher non-HDL-C and LDL density.

KEYWORDS:

Cut-off points; High-density lipoprotein cholesterol; Lipids; Remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol; TG/HDL-C ratio; Triglycerides

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center