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Addict Behav. 2015 Dec;51:57-64. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.006. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Correlates of gambling on high-school grounds.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States; Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States.
3
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, United States; Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, Boston, MA, United States.
4
Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Guilford, CT, United States.
5
Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Problem Gambling Services, Middletown, CT, United States.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States; Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, United States; Department of Neurobiology, Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, United States; CASAColumbia, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States. Electronic address: marc.potenza@yale.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined adolescent gambling on school grounds (GS+) and how such behavior was associated with gambling-related attitudes. Further, we examined whether GS+ moderated associations between at-risk problem-gambling (ARPG) and gambling behaviors related to gambling partners.

METHOD:

Participants were 1988 high-school students who completed survey materials. Demographic, perceptions, attitudes, and gambling variables were stratified by problem-gambling severity (ARPG versus recreational gambling) and GS+ status. Chi-square and adjusted logistic regression models were used to examine relationships among study variables.

RESULTS:

Nearly 40% (39.58%) of students reported past-year GS+, with 12.91% of GS+ students, relative to 2.63% of those who did not report gambling on school grounds (GS-), meeting DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling (p<0.0001). In comparison to GS- students, GS+ students were more likely to report poorer academic achievement and more permissive attitudes towards gambling behaviors. Weaker links in GS+ students, in comparison with GS-, students, were observed between problem-gambling severity and gambling with family members (interaction odds ratio (IOR)=0.60; 95% CI=0.39-0.92) and gambling with friends (IOR=0.21; 95% CI=0.11-0.39).

CONCLUSIONS:

GS+ is common and associated with pathological gambling and more permissive attitudes towards gambling. The finding that GS+ (relative to GS-) youth show differences in how problem-gambling is related to gambling partners (friends and family) warrants further investigation regarding whether and how peer and familial interactions might be improved to diminish youth problem-gambling severity. The high frequency of GS+ and its relationship with ARPG highlights a need for school administrators and personnel to consider interventions that target school-based gambling.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; At-risk; Gambling; School

PMID:
26232102
PMCID:
PMC4558206
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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