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Nutr J. 2015 Aug 1;14:76. doi: 10.1186/s12937-015-0063-7.

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia: evidence from meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049, P. R. China.
2
Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049, P. R. China. jhf@sdut.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In recent years, the associations between vitamin D status and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia have gained increasing interests. The present meta-analysis was designed to estimate the association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of developing AD and dementia.

METHODS:

A literature search conducted until February 2015 identified 10 study populations, which were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated with a random-effect model using Stata software package.

RESULTS:

Results of our meta-analysis showed that subjects with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D level < 50 nmol/L) were at increased risk of developing AD by 21% compared with those possessing 25(OH)D level > 50 nmol/L. Similar analysis also found a significantly increased dementia risk in vitamin D deficient subjects. There is no evidence for significant heterogeneity among the included studies.

CONCLUSION:

Available data indicates that lower vitamin D status may be associated with increased risk of developing AD and dementia. More studies are needed to further confirm the associations and to evaluate the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in preventing AD and dementia.

PMID:
26231781
PMCID:
PMC4522102
DOI:
10.1186/s12937-015-0063-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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