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J Neurosurg. 2015 Dec;123(6):1555-61. doi: 10.3171/2015.1.JNS142761. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Aneurysm location and clipping versus coiling for development of secondary normal-pressure hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: Japanese Stroke DataBank.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Stroke Center and Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Center, and.
2
Department of Neurology, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital;
3
Department of Neurology, Rakuwakai Misasagi Hospital, Kyoto; and.
4
Shimane University, Shimane, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECT:

The present study aimed to investigate aneurysm locations and treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysms associated with secondary normal-pressure hydrocephalus (sNPH) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by using comprehensive data from the Japanese Stroke DataBank.

METHODS:

Among 101,165 patients with acute stroke registered between 2000 and 2013, 4693 patients (1482 men, 3211 women) were registered as having had an SAH caused by a ruptured saccular aneurysm. Of them, 1448 patients (438 men and 1010 women; mean age 61.9 ± 13.4 years) who were confirmed to have or not have coexisting acute hydrocephalus and sNPH were included for statistical analyses. Locations of the ruptured aneurysms were subcategorized into 1 of the following 4 groups: middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 354), anterior communicating artery and anterior cerebral artery (ACA; n = 496), internal carotid artery (ICA; n = 402), and posterior circulation (n = 130). Locations of 66 of the ruptured aneurysms were unknown/unrecorded. Treatments included craniotomy and clipping alone in 1073 patients, endovascular coil embolization alone in 285 patients, and a combination of coiling and clipping in 17 patients. The age-adjusted and multivariate odds ratios from logistic regression analyses were calculated after stratification using the Fisher CT scale to investigate the effects of the hematoma volume of SAH.

RESULTS:

Acute hydrocephalus was confirmed in 593 patients, and 521 patients developed sNPH. Patients with a ruptured ACA aneurysm had twice the risk for sNPH over those with a ruptured MCA aneurysm. Those with an ACA aneurysm with Fisher Grade 3 SAH had a 9-fold-higher risk for sNPH than those with an MCA aneurysm with Fisher Grade 1 or 2 SAH. Patients with a ruptured posterior circulation aneurysm did not have any significant risk for sNPH. Clipping of the ruptured aneurysm resulted in twice the risk for sNPH over coil embolization alone.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with low-grade SAH caused by a ruptured MCA aneurysm had a low risk for the development of sNPH. In contrast, patients with high-grade SAH caused by a ruptured ACA aneurysm had a higher risk for sNPH. Endovascular coiling might confer a lower risk of developing sNPH than microsurgical clipping.

KEYWORDS:

ACA = anterior cerebral artery; ICA = internal carotid artery; MCA = middle cerebral artery; NPH = normal-pressure hydrocephalus; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage; WFNS = World Federation of Neurological Societies; acute hydrocephalus; endovascular coil embolization; sNPH = secondary NPH; secondary NPH; subarachnoid hemorrhage; vascular disorders

PMID:
26230474
DOI:
10.3171/2015.1.JNS142761
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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