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Endocr Relat Cancer. 2015 Oct;22(5):R265-77. doi: 10.1530/ERC-15-0209. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

The emerging role of the androgen receptor in bladder cancer.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs-Northern California Health Care System Mather, California, USA Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Biochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Group and Biotechnology Program, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall 3147, UC Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA Veterans Affairs-Northern California Health Care System Mather, California, USA Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Biochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Group and Biotechnology Program, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall 3147, UC Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA Veterans Affairs-Northern California Health Care System Mather, California, USA Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Biochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Group and Biotechnology Program, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall 3147, UC Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA mmudryj@ucdavis.edu aplombard@ucdavis.edu.
2
Veterans Affairs-Northern California Health Care System Mather, California, USA Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Biochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Group and Biotechnology Program, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall 3147, UC Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA Veterans Affairs-Northern California Health Care System Mather, California, USA Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Biochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Group and Biotechnology Program, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall 3147, UC Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA mmudryj@ucdavis.edu aplombard@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Men are three to four times more likely to get bladder cancer than women. The gender disparity characterizing bladder cancer diagnoses has been investigated. One hypothesis is that androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved in the etiology and progression of this disease. Although bladder cancer is not typically described as an endocrine-related malignancy, it has become increasingly clear that AR signaling plays a role in bladder tumors. This review summarizes current findings regarding the role of the AR in bladder cancer. We discuss work demonstrating AR expression in bladder cancer and its role in promoting formation and progression of tumors. Additionally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting the AR in this disease.

KEYWORDS:

androgen receptor; bladder cancer; endocrine therapy

PMID:
26229034
DOI:
10.1530/ERC-15-0209
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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