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Br J Nutr. 2015 Oct 14;114(7):999-1012. doi: 10.1017/S0007114515002093. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Low-grade inflammation, diet composition and health: current research evidence and its translation.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition,Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia,NorwichNR4 7TJ,UK.
2
Mondelēz International - R&D, Nutrition Department,91400Saclay,France.
3
Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen,AberdeenAB21 9SB,UK.
4
Formerly ILSI Europe a.i.s.b.l.,Avenue E. Mounier 83, Box 6,B-1200Brussels,Belgium.
5
Nutrigenomics Research Group, UCD Institute of Food and Health and UCD Conway Institute, Belfield, University College Dublin,Dublin 4,Republic of Ireland.
6
Department of Food Quality and Nutrition,Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige,38010Trento,Italy.
7
Centre for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Southampton,SouthamptonSO16 6YD,UK.
8
Department of Human Biology,NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University,Maastricht,The Netherlands.
9
Nutrigenomics and Neurodegenerative Disease Prevention, Preventative Health Flagship, CSIRO, Animal, Food and Health Sciences,Adelaide,Australia.
10
Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, Zeist,3704HE,The Netherlands.
11
Newtricious R&D B.V., Oirlo,5808AL,The Netherlands.
12
School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire,HatfieldAL10 9AB,UK.
13
Department of Internal Medicine,University of Perugia,Perugia,Italy.
14
Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.
15
Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton,SouthamptonSO16 6YD,UK.

Abstract

The importance of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathology of numerous age-related chronic conditions is now clear. An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development. The present position paper is the most recent in a series produced by the International Life Sciences Institute's European Branch (ILSI Europe). It is co-authored by the speakers from a 2013 workshop led by the Obesity and Diabetes Task Force entitled 'Low-grade inflammation, a high-grade challenge: biomarkers and modulation by dietary strategies'. The latest research in the areas of acute and chronic inflammation and cardiometabolic, gut and cognitive health is presented along with the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation-health/disease associations. The evidence relating diet composition and early-life nutrition to inflammatory status is reviewed. Human epidemiological and intervention data are thus far heavily reliant on the measurement of inflammatory markers in the circulation, and in particular cytokines in the fasting state, which are recognised as an insensitive and highly variable index of tissue inflammation. Potential novel kinetic and integrated approaches to capture inflammatory status in humans are discussed. Such approaches are likely to provide a more discriminating means of quantifying inflammation-health/disease associations, and the ability of diet to positively modulate inflammation and provide the much needed evidence to develop research portfolios that will inform new product development and associated health claims.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Chronic diseases; Health claims; Low-grade inflammation

PMID:
26228057
PMCID:
PMC4579563
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114515002093
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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