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Cell Tissue Res. 2016 Jan;363(1):85-96. doi: 10.1007/s00441-015-2237-1. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

The protein and transcript profiles of human semen.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA.
2
Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA. steve@compbio.med.wayne.edu.
4
Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA. steve@compbio.med.wayne.edu.

Abstract

The increasing use of "-omics" (genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, epigenomic, and metabolomic) high-throughput measurement technologies over the past decade is beginning to reveal the complexity of human biology and physiology through the interactions of DNA, RNA, related proteins and small molecules. In reproductive medicine, the majority of this work, has thus far focused on the female factors, e.g., the oocyte, since they provide both the environment and the majority of elements required for embryogenesis. State-of-the-art sequencing and computational analyses have enabled a deeper understanding of the underlying components. Contrary to being simply a silent delivery vehicle to the oocyte of the packaged male DNA, sperm provide both a specific epigenetically marked genome together with a complex population of RNAs and proteins that are crucial for early embryogenesis. In addition to the sperm, seminal fluid appears to serve multiple roles providing a supplementary series of components that allow the sperm to successfully reach and fertilize the oocyte and prepare the female immune system to tolerate the semiallosteric embryo. A global analysis and review of what is presently known regarding the unique role of each component of the male factor and their associated interactions begins to shed light on this emergent field.

KEYWORDS:

Proteomics; RNA-sequencing; Seminal fluid; Spermatozoa

PMID:
26224537
DOI:
10.1007/s00441-015-2237-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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