Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2015 Aug 1;40(15):1158-64. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000001012.

ISSLS Prize Winner: Dynamic Loading-Induced Convective Transport Enhances Intervertebral Disc Nutrition.

Author information

1
*Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY †Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY; and ‡Veterinary Specialties, Pattersonville, NY.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Experimental animal study of convective transport in the intervertebral disc.

OBJECTIVE:

To quantify the effects of mechanical loading rate on net transport into the healthy and degenerative intervertebral disc in vivo.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Intervertebral disc degeneration is linked with a reduction in transport to the avascular disc. Enhancing disc nutrition is, therefore, a potential strategy to slow or reverse the degenerative cascade. Convection induced by mechanical loading is a potential mechanism to augment diffusion of small molecules into the disc.

METHODS:

Skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits with healthy discs and discs degenerated via needle puncture were subjected to low rate axial compression and distraction loading for 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 minutes after a bolus administration of gadodiamide. Additional animals with healthy discs were subjected to high-rate loading for 10 minutes or no loading for 10 minutes. Transport into the disc for each loading regimen was quantified using post-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

Low-rate loading resulted in the rapid uptake and clearance of gadodiamide in the disc. Low-rate loading increased net transport into the nucleus by a mean 16.8% and 12.6% in healthy and degenerative discs, respectively. The kinetics of small molecule uptake and clearance were accelerated in both healthy and degenerative discs with low-rate loading. In contrast, high-rate loading reduced transport into nucleus by a mean 16.8%.

CONCLUSION:

These results illustrate that trans-endplate diffusion can be enhanced by forced convection in both healthy and degenerative discs in vivo. Mechanical loading-induced convection could offer therapeutic benefit for degenerated discs by enhancing uptake of nutrients and clearance of by-products.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

4.

PMID:
26222661
DOI:
10.1097/BRS.0000000000001012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center