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Blood Rev. 2016 Jan;30(1):11-9. doi: 10.1016/j.blre.2015.07.001. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

The prothrombotic activity of cancer cells in the circulation.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Department of Cell, Developmental and Cancer Biology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Divison of Hematology & Medical Oncology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. Electronic address: mitrugno@ohsu.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. Electronic address: tormoeng@ohsu.edu.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: pkuhn@usc.edu.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Department of Cell, Developmental and Cancer Biology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Divison of Hematology & Medical Oncology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. Electronic address: mccartyo@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

The hemostatic system is often subverted in patients with cancer, resulting in life-threatening venous thrombotic events. Despite the multifactorial and complex etiology of cancer-associated thrombosis, changes in the expression and activity of cancer-derived tissue factor (TF) - the principle initiator of the coagulation cascade - are considered key to malignant hypercoagulopathy and to the pathophysiology of thrombosis. However, many of the molecular and cellular mechanisms coupling the hemostatic degeneration to malignancy remain largely uncharacterized. In this review we discuss some of the tumor-intrinsic and tumor-extrinsic mechanisms that may contribute to the prothrombotic state of cancer, and we bring into focus the potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in advancing our understanding of the field. We also summarize the current status of anti-coagulant therapy for the treatment of thrombosis in patients with cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Circulating tumor cells; Coagulation; Platelets; Thrombosis; Tissue factor

PMID:
26219246
PMCID:
PMC4942124
DOI:
10.1016/j.blre.2015.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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