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J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Aug;21(8):496-503. doi: 10.1089/acm.2014.0281. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

Are Mindfulness and Self-Compassion Associated with Sleep and Resilience in Health Professionals?

Kemper KJ1,2, Mo X2,3, Khayat R3,4.

Author information

1
1 Department of Pediatrics, College of Nursing: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus, OH.
2
2 Center for Integrative Health and Wellness, Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus, OH.
3
3 Center for Biostatistics, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus, OH.
4
4 The OSU Sleep Heart Program, Department of Medicine, and Davis Heart-Lung Research Institute, Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the relationship between trainable qualities (mindfulness and self-compassion), with factors conceptually related to burnout and quality of care (sleep and resilience) in young health professionals and trainees.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Large Midwestern academic health center.

PARTICIPANTS:

213 clinicians and trainees.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Sleep and resilience were assessed by using the 8-item PROMIS Sleep scale and the 6-item Brief Resilience Scale. Mindfulness and self-compassion were assessed using the 10-item Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale, Revised and the 12-item Self-Compassion Scale. Health was assessed with Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Global Health measures, and stress was assessed with the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale. After examination of descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations, multiple regression analyses were done to determine whether mindfulness and self-compassion were associated with better sleep and resilience.

RESULTS:

Respondents had an average age of 28 years; 73% were female. Professions included dieticians (11%), nurses (14%), physicians (38%), social workers (24%), and other (12%). Univariate analyses showed normative values for all variables. Sleep disturbances were significantly and most strongly correlated with perceived stress and poorer health, but also with less mindfulness and self-compassion. Resilience was strongly and significantly correlated with less stress and better mental health, more mindfulness, and more self-compassion.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these young health professionals and trainees, sleep and resilience are correlated with both mindfulness and self-compassion. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether training to increase mindfulness and self-compassion can improve clinicians' sleep and resilience or whether decreasing sleep disturbances and building resilience improves mindfulness and compassion.

PMID:
26218885
PMCID:
PMC4523072
DOI:
10.1089/acm.2014.0281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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