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Trends Biotechnol. 2015 Sep;33(9):504-13. doi: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2015.06.007. Epub 2015 Jul 24.

Bioprinting for cancer research.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 260 Glenbrook Road, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
3
Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 260 Glenbrook Road, Storrs, CT 06269, USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. Electronic address: savas@engr.uconn.edu.

Abstract

Bioprinting offers the ability to create highly complex 3D architectures with living cells. This cutting-edge technique has significantly gained popularity and applicability in several fields. Bioprinting methods have been developed to effectively and rapidly pattern living cells, biological macromolecules, and biomaterials. These technologies hold great potential for applications in cancer research. Bioprinted cancer models represent a significant improvement over previous 2D models by mimicking 3D complexity and facilitating physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we review bioprinting methods based on inkjet, microextrusion, and laser technologies and compare 3D cancer models with 2D cancer models. We discuss bioprinted models that mimic the tumor microenvironment, providing a platform for deeper understanding of cancer pathology, anticancer drug screening, and cancer treatment development.

PMID:
26216543
DOI:
10.1016/j.tibtech.2015.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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