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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Dec;104(12):e569-76. doi: 10.1111/apa.13142. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Parental factors affecting the circumcision of non-Muslim Chinese boys include education and family history.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Endemic Disease Control, Xinjinag Center of Disease Control and Prevention, Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.
3
College of Basic Medicine, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.
4
Department of Epidemiology & Statistics, School of Public Health, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.
5
Chinese Traditional Medical Hospital affiliated to Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.

Abstract

AIM:

This study investigated the prevalence of circumcision among non-Muslim schoolboys in Urumqi, China, and how acceptable their parents found the practice.

METHODS:

A convenient cluster sample of non-Muslim schoolboys (n = 3614) aged six to 15 years of age and 873 mothers and 927 fathers completed self-administered questionnaires. We compared the consistency of the circumcision status reported by students and their parents and analysed the factors that influenced the parents to have their child circumcised.

RESULTS:

The mean age at circumcision was 8.3 years and the adjusted prevalence was 46.2%. Up to 45.4% of fathers and 66% of mothers with uncircumcised sons were willing to circumcise their sons after receiving further information on circumcision. Mothers were more likely to support circumcision if they had higher education levels and higher family income, were employed as government officials and had family members who had been circumcised, including their husband. Fathers were more likely to support circumcision if they were highly educated and had been circumcised themselves.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence and acceptability of circumcision were higher than expected in this traditional schoolboy population in Urumqi, China. Factors that increased parental support for circumcision included high education and the father being circumcised.

KEYWORDS:

Acceptability; China; HIV infection; Male circumcision; Non-Muslim

PMID:
26215895
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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