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J Community Health. 2016 Feb;41(1):87-96. doi: 10.1007/s10900-015-0071-8.

Community Trial of a Faith-Based Lifestyle Intervention to Prevent Diabetes Among African-Americans.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 1120 15th Street, AF-1001, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA. rsattin@gru.edu.
2
College of Nursing, Georgia Regents University, 987 St. Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA. rsattin@gru.edu.
3
College of Nursing, Georgia Regents University, 987 St. Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA.
4
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 1120 15th Street, AE-1036, Augusta, GA, 30912, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, 505B Parran Hall, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA.
6
Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Room 7040 N., Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.

Abstract

About 75% of African-Americans (AAs) ages 20 or older are overweight and nearly 50% are obese, but community-based programs to reduce diabetes risk in AAs are rare. Our objective was to reduce weight and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and increase physical activity (PA) from baseline to week-12 and to month-12 among overweight AA parishioners through a faith-based adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program called Fit Body and Soul (FBAS). We conducted a single-blinded, cluster randomized, community trial in 20 AA churches enrolling 604 AAs, aged 20-64 years with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and without diabetes. The church (and their parishioners) was randomized to FBAS or health education (HE). FBAS participants had a significant difference in adjusted weight loss compared with those in HE (2.62 vs. 0.50 kg, p = 0.001) at 12-weeks and (2.39 vs. -0.465 kg, p = 0.005) at 12-months and were more likely (13%) than HE participants (3%) to achieve a 7% weight loss (p < 0.001) at 12-weeks and a 7% weight loss (19 vs. 8%, p < 0.001) at 12-months. There were no significant differences in FPG and PA between arms. Of the 15.2% of participants with baseline pre-diabetes, those in FBAS had, however, a significant decline in FPG (10.93 mg/dl) at 12-weeks compared with the 4.22 mg/dl increase in HE (p = 0.017), and these differences became larger at 12-months (FBAS, 12.38 mg/dl decrease; HE, 4.44 mg/dl increase) (p = 0.021). Our faith-based adaptation of the DPP led to a significant reduction in weight overall and in FPG among pre-diabetes participants. CLINICALTRIALS.

GOV IDENTIFIER:

NCT01730196.

KEYWORDS:

African-American; Diabetes prevention; Obesity; Translation research

PMID:
26215167
PMCID:
PMC4715566
DOI:
10.1007/s10900-015-0071-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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