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Lancet Infect Dis. 2015 Oct;15(10):1236-1242. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00064-X. Epub 2015 Jul 23.

The Israeli public health response to wild poliovirus importation.

Author information

1
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; The Division of Epidemiology, Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: eran.kopel@mail.huji.ac.il.
3
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; The Division of Epidemiology, Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Hebrew University Hadassah Faculty of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.
4
Central Virology Laboratory, Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
5
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; Faculty for Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
6
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; The Division of Epidemiology, Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel.
7
Central Virology Laboratory, Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
8
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Pediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel.
9
Haifa District Health Office, Ministry of Health, Haifa, Israel; School of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Welfare Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
10
Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel.
11
Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; School of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Welfare Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
12
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Israel Center for Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
13
Faculty for Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel; South District Health Office, Ministry of Health, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
14
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

In 2013, a silent wild poliovirus type 1 importation and sustained transmission event occurred in southern Israel. With the aim of preventing clinical poliomyelitis and ensuring virus re-elimination, the public health response to the importation event included intensification of clinical and environmental surveillance activities, enhancement of vaccine coverage, and supplemental immunisation with a bivalent oral polio vaccine against wild poliovirus types 1 and 3. A national campaign launched in August, 2013, resulted in vaccination of 943,587 children younger than 10 years (79% of the eligible target population). Expanded environmental surveillance (roughly 80% population coverage) documented a gradual disappearance of wild poliovirus type 1 in the country from September, 2013, to April, 2014. No paralytic poliomyelitis case was detected. A prompt extensive and coordinated national public health response, implemented on the basis of evidence-based decision making, successfully contained this serious importation and sustained transmission event of wild poliovirus to Israel. On April 28, 2015, WHO officially declared Israel as a polio-free country.

PMID:
26213249
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00064-X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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