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Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2016 Sep;33(8):797-806. doi: 10.1177/1049909115594353. Epub 2015 Jul 26.

A Systematic Review of Family Meeting Tools in Palliative and Intensive Care Settings.

Author information

1
David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA asinger@rand.org.
2
T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.
3
College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA Quality Improvement Resource Center, Greater Los Angeles VA Health Care System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
5
Quality Improvement Resource Center, Greater Los Angeles VA Health Care System, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
6
Quality Improvement Resource Center, Greater Los Angeles VA Health Care System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Lebanon, PA, USA.
7
RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA Fielding School of Public Health, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Family meetings can be challenging, requiring a range of skills and participation. We sought to identify tools available to aid the conduct of family meetings in palliative, hospice, and intensive care unit settings.

METHODS:

We systematically reviewed PubMed for articles describing family meeting tools and abstracted information on tool type, usage, and content.

RESULTS:

We identified 16 articles containing 23 tools in 7 categories: meeting guide (n = 8), meeting planner (n = 5), documentation template (n = 4), meeting strategies (n = 2), decision aid/screener (n = 2), family checklist (n = 1), and training module (n = 1). We found considerable variation across tools in usage and content and a lack of tools supporting family engagement.

CONCLUSION:

There is need to standardize family meeting tools and develop tools to help family members effectively engage in the process.

KEYWORDS:

caregivers; communication; interdisciplinary communication; palliative care/psychology; professional–family relations; review

PMID:
26213225
PMCID:
PMC4728031
DOI:
10.1177/1049909115594353
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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