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Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Aug;65(637):e500-7. doi: 10.3399/bjgp15X686065.

Quality care provision for older people: an interview study with patients and primary healthcare professionals.

Author information

1
Department of Primary and Community Care;
2
Head of the Academic Educational Institute, Academic Educational Institute;
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Haga Teaching Hospital, The Hague, the Netherlands.
4
Elderly Care, Elderly care organization 'De Zorggroep', Venlo, the Netherlands.
5
Department of Geriatrics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In recent years, primary health care for the ageing population has become increasingly complex.

AIM:

This study sought to explore the views and needs of healthcare professionals and older patients relating to primary care in order to identify focal areas for improving primary health care for older people.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

This research was structured as a mixed interview study with focus groups and individual interviews. Participants were made up of primary healthcare professionals and older patients. Patients were recruited from five elderly care homes in a small city in the southern part of the Netherlands.

METHOD:

All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two individual researchers applying constant comparative analysis. Data collection proceeded until saturation was reached.

RESULTS:

Participants in the study agreed about the need for primary care for older patients, and showed sympathy with one another's perspectives. They did note, however, a number of obstacles hindering good healthcare provision. The major themes that arose were: 'autonomy and independence', 'organisational barriers', and 'professional expertise'. Participants generally noted that it is important to clarify differences in perspectives about good care between patients and healthcare professionals.

CONCLUSION:

Effective primary care intervention for older patients requires mutual understanding of the expectations and goals of all parties involved. There are a number of important requirements, especially accessible patient information in the form of care plans; specialist training for nurses and GPs on complex care and multimorbidity; and training on discussing autonomy, goal setting, and shared care. Further improvement in health care for older people and its evaluation research should focus on these requirements.

KEYWORDS:

care homes; focus groups; health services for older people; patient-centred care; primary care

PMID:
26212845
PMCID:
PMC4513737
DOI:
10.3399/bjgp15X686065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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