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Stem Cell Rev. 2015 Dec;11(6):804-12. doi: 10.1007/s12015-015-9610-z.

Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044, People's Republic of China.
2
Institute of Bioengineering and School of Engineering & Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS, UK.
3
Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044, People's Republic of China. song@cqu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanics; Differentiation; Nuclear mechanics; Stem cells

PMID:
26210993
DOI:
10.1007/s12015-015-9610-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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