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J Clin Virol. 2015 Aug;69:117-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2015.06.079. Epub 2015 Jun 17.

Enterovirus D68 disease and molecular epidemiology in Australia.

Author information

1
PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, Perth, Australia; School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Electronic address: Avram.levy@health.wa.gov.au.
2
National Enterovirus Reference Laboratory, VIDRL, Doherty Institute, Melbourne, Australia; School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
3
PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, Perth, Australia.
4
PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, Perth, Australia; Current affiliate: Communicable Disease Control Directorate, Health Department of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
5
Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia; Discipline of Paediatrics and Child health and the Marie Bashir Institute for Emerging Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, Australia.
6
National Referral Hospital, Honiara, Solomon Islands.
7
The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; The University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Melbourne, Australia.
8
PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, Perth, Australia; School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) has received considerable recent attention as a cause of widespread respiratory illness. Neurological syndromes such as acute flaccid paralysis following EV-D68 infection have also been reported in a small number of cases.

OBJECTIVES:

To summarize the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of laboratory confirmed EV-D68 cases in Australia.

STUDY DESIGN:

We combined EV-D68 data acquired through laboratory surveillance in Western Australia with cases from national enterovirus surveillance and regional acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. Clinical data was obtained for EV-D68 cases and capsid protein sequences were used for phylogenetic analysis.

RESULTS:

Sporadic cases of EV-D68 were recorded in Australia since 2008, with peaks in activity during 2011 and 2013. EV-D68 was primarily associated with respiratory disease, but was also detected in cerebrospinal fluid of one patient and faeces of two patients presenting with AFP.

CONCLUSIONS:

EV-D68 has been circulating in Western Australia and is likely to have also been present in the wider region for a number of years, causing primarily respiratory disease. Detection of EV-D68 in cerebrospinal fluid of one patient and in faeces of two AFP cases reinforces the association between EV-D68 and neurological disease.

KEYWORDS:

Background; Emerging diseases; Laboratory surveillance; Respiratory viruses; Viral infections

PMID:
26209392
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2015.06.079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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