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Dysphagia. 2015 Oct;30(5):489-95. doi: 10.1007/s00455-015-9627-0. Epub 2015 Jul 25.

Hypersialorrhea in Wilson's Disease.

Author information

1
French Reference Centre for Wilson's Disease, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75010, Paris, France. cnr.wilson@aphp.fr.
2
French Reference Centre for Wilson's Disease, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75010, Paris, France.
3
Service ORL, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75010, Paris, France.
4
French Reference Centre for Wilson's Disease, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75010, Paris, France. france.woimant@aphp.fr.

Abstract

Hypersialorrhea, corresponding to excessive salivation is a symptom frequently reported in Wilson's disease, especially in its neurological form. The prevalence of this frequent complaint has not been often evaluated. During a 7-month period, 87 consecutive Wilson's disease patients answered to the simple question "do you have the sensation of excess saliva in your mouth?" to evaluate the frequency of this symptom. A sub-sample of 10 consecutive Wilson's disease patients with drooling was recruited to undergo quantitative and qualitative measures to evaluate the mechanism of hypersialorrhea. Excessive drooling or excess saliva was found in 46 % of patients followed at the French Reference Centre. Ninety-eight percent of them presented neurological symptoms and drooling was found in only one patient without neurological symptoms. Our study showed that patients with a complaint of excessive saliva produced significantly higher quantities of saliva at rest than controls. Endoscopic examination was abnormal in six patients. A significant decrease of swallowing frequency, longer swallow latencies, and poor swallowing capacities may partly explain the salivary stasis. Oropharyngeal sensitivity disorders were present in 50 % of our patients. The decrease of the swallowing frequency observed in all patients could be related to cognitive and behavioral abnormalities with initiation difficulties objectified by longer latencies triggered by all the ingested volumes. This study confirmed the hypothesis of a multifactorial origin of hypersialorrhea in patients who have been diagnosed in Wilson's disease. It was essential to evaluate drooling with a multidisciplinary consultation to better identify the underlying mechanisms and to implement strategies for speech therapy and therapeutic adaptation.

KEYWORDS:

Deglutition; Deglutition disorders; Drooling; Dysphagia; Hypersialorrhea; Wilson’s disease

PMID:
26209285
DOI:
10.1007/s00455-015-9627-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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