Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Insect Sci. 2015 Jul 23;15. pii: 107. doi: 10.1093/jisesa/iev083. Print 2015.

Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Effects Associated With the Wing Shape of Seven Moth Species of Sphingidae (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea).

Author information

1
Laboratório de Interação Inseto-Planta, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, CP 04457, Brasília, DF 70919-970, Brazil Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Embrapa Cerrados, Coleção Entomológica, Rodovia BR 020, km 18, CP 08223, Planaltina, DF 73310-970, Brazil Corresponding author: E-mail: willian.rogers.camargo@gmail.com.
2
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, CP 04457, Brasília, DF 70919-970, Brazil.
3
Centro Nacional de Pesquisa e Conservação da Biodiversidade do Cerrado e Caatinga, Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade, EQSW 103/104, Bloco "C", Complexo Administrativo - Setor Sudoeste CEP: 70.670-350 - Brasilia - DF.
4
Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Embrapa Cerrados, Coleção Entomológica, Rodovia BR 020, km 18, CP 08223, Planaltina, DF 73310-970, Brazil.
5
Laboratório de Interação Inseto-Planta, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, CP 04457, Brasília, DF 70919-970, Brazil.

Abstract

Sexual dimorphism is a pronounced pattern of intraspecific variation in Lepidoptera. However, moths of the family Sphingidae (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea) are considered exceptions to this rule. We used geometric morphometric techniques to detect shape and size sexual dimorphism in the fore and hindwings of seven hawkmoth species. The shape variables produced were then subjected to a discriminant analysis. The allometric effects were measured with a simple regression between the canonical variables and the centroid size. We also used the normalized residuals to assess the nonallometric component of shape variation with a t-test. The deformations in wing shape between sexes per species were assessed with a regression between the nonreduced shape variables and the residuals. We found sexual dimorphism in both wings in all analyzed species, and that the allometric effects were responsible for much of the wing shape variation between the sexes. However, when we removed the size effects, we observed shape sexual dimorphism. It is very common for females to be larger than males in Lepidoptera, so it is expected that the shape of structures such as wings suffers deformations in order to preserve their function. However, sources of variation other than allometry could be a reflection of different reproductive flight behavior (long flights in search for sexual mates in males, and flight in search for host plants in females).

KEYWORDS:

Dilophonotini; Macroglossini; Philampelini; geometric morphometric; sexual selection

PMID:
26206895
PMCID:
PMC4672217
DOI:
10.1093/jisesa/iev083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center