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BMC Fam Pract. 2015 Jul 25;16:89. doi: 10.1186/s12875-015-0304-z.

Primary care nurses' performance in motivational interviewing: a quantitative descriptive study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 564, Uppsala, 751 22, Sweden. ann-sofi.ostlund@hig.se.
2
Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, 801 76, Sweden. ann-sofi.ostlund@hig.se.
3
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 564, Uppsala, 751 22, Sweden. marja-leena.kristofferzon@hig.se.
4
Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, 801 76, Sweden. marja-leena.kristofferzon@hig.se.
5
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 564, Uppsala, 751 22, Sweden. elisabeth.haggstrom@hig.se.
6
Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, 801 76, Sweden. elisabeth.haggstrom@hig.se.
7
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 564, Uppsala, 751 22, Sweden. barbro.wadensten@pubcare.uu.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style intended to strengthen motivation to change. It has been shown to be effective in addressing many different lifestyle problems as well as in chronic disease management, and many disease prevention guidelines promote use of motivational interviewing. The aim of the present study was twofold: to assess to what extent the primary care nurses in the study perform motivational interviewing according to the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code and to investigate how the participating primary care nurses rated their own performance in motivational interviewing.

METHOD:

The study was based on twelve primary care nurses' audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions with patients (total 32 sessions). After each session, the nurses completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of their own performance in motivational interviewing. The audio-recorded sessions were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code 3.1.1.

RESULTS:

None of the nurses achieved beginning proficiency in all parts of any motivational interviewing sessions and two nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency in any parts or sessions. Making more complex than simple reflections was the specific verbal behavior/summary score that most nurses achieved. Beginning proficiency/competency in "percent open questions" was the summary score that fewest achieved.

CONCLUSION:

Primary care nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency/competency in all aspects of motivational interviewing in their recorded sessions with patients, where lifestyle change was discussed. This indicates a need for improvement and thus additional training, feedback and supervision in clinical practice with motivational interviewing.

PMID:
26205692
PMCID:
PMC4513379
DOI:
10.1186/s12875-015-0304-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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