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Cell Tissue Res. 2016 Feb;363(2):337-49. doi: 10.1007/s00441-015-2233-5. Epub 2015 Jul 24.

Collagens and proteoglycans of the cornea: importance in transparency and visual disorders.

Author information

1
EA4555, Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.
2
CHU Toulouse, Hôpital Purpan, Service d'Ophtalmologie, Toulouse, France.
3
EA4555, Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. sgaliacy@yahoo.fr.
4
CHU Toulouse, Hôpital Purpan, Service d'Ophtalmologie, Toulouse, France. sgaliacy@yahoo.fr.

Abstract

The cornea represents the external part of the eye and consists of an epithelium, a stroma and an endothelium. Due to its curvature and transparency this structure makes up approximately 70% of the total refractive power of the eye. This function is partly made possible by the particular organization of the collagen extracellular matrix contained in the corneal stroma that allows a constant refractive power. The maintenance of such an organization involves other molecules such as type V collagen, FACITs (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) and SLRPs (small leucine-rich proteoglycans). These components play crucial roles in the preservation of the correct organization and function of the cornea since their absence or modification leads to abnormalities such as corneal opacities. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the different corneal collagens and proteoglycans by highlighting their importance in corneal transparency as well as their implication in corneal visual disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Collagens; Corneal opacities; Corneal transparency; FACIT; SLRPs

PMID:
26205093
DOI:
10.1007/s00441-015-2233-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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