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PLoS One. 2015 Jul 23;10(7):e0133387. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133387. eCollection 2015.

Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks.

Author information

1
Centre de Biologie du Développement, UMR 5547 CNRS Université de Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062, Toulouse cedex 09, France.
2
Centre de Biologie du Développement, UMR 5547 CNRS Université de Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062, Toulouse cedex 09, France; Plate-forme bio-informatique Genotoul/MIA-T, INRA, Borde Rouge, 31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France.
3
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/Université de Strasbourg, 67404, Illkirch, France.

Abstract

Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1) transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col) targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya) is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles.

PMID:
26204530
PMCID:
PMC4512700
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0133387
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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