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Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2015 Aug;16(8):473-85. doi: 10.1038/nrm4025.

Short- and long-term effects of chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy.

Author information

1
1] Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815-6789, USA. [3] Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Erratum in

  • Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2015 Sep;16(9):576.

Abstract

Dividing cells that experience chromosome mis-segregation generate aneuploid daughter cells, which contain an incorrect number of chromosomes. Although aneuploidy interferes with the proliferation of untransformed cells, it is also, paradoxically, a hallmark of cancer, a disease defined by increased proliferative potential. These contradictory effects are also observed in mouse models of chromosome instability (CIN). CIN can inhibit and promote tumorigenesis. Recent work has provided insights into the cellular consequences of CIN and aneuploidy. Chromosome mis-segregation per se can alter the genome in many more ways than just causing the gain or loss of chromosomes. The short- and long-term effects of aneuploidy are caused by gene-specific effects and a stereotypic aneuploidy stress response. Importantly, these recent findings provide insights into the role of aneuploidy in tumorigenesis.

PMID:
26204159
DOI:
10.1038/nrm4025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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