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NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2015 Jul 23;25:15048. doi: 10.1038/npjpcrm.2015.48.

Predictors of poor-quality spirometry in two cohorts of older adults in Russia and Belgium: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Institute of Health and Society, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Department of Family Medicine, North-Western State Medical University, St Petersburg, Russia.
3
1] Institute of Health and Society, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium [2] Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Spirometry is an important test for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases, yet it is underused especially in older adults. Several predictors of good-quality spirometry in this age group have been reported, based mainly on in/outpatients of geriatric and/or respiratory units.

AIMS:

This study aims to assess predictors of poor-quality spirometry in community-dwelling older adults from two primary care cohorts in Russia and Belgium.

METHODS:

Spirograms from two population-based cohort studies in Russia (CRYSTAL) and Belgium (BELFRAIL) were assessed in accordance with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) acceptability and repeatability criteria and grouped into good and poor quality. Multivariable analysis assessed the association of poor-quality spirometry with socio-demographics, functional dependency, physical and mental functioning and co-morbidities.

RESULTS:

In all, 43.3% of the 522 BELFRAIL participants (84.71 ± 3.67 years old) and 57.7% of the 605 CRYSTAL participants (75.11 ± 5.97 years old) achieved all ATS/ERS acceptability and repeatability criteria. In both cohorts, those with poor-quality spirometry had lower cognitive function (mini-mental state examination (MMSE) ⩽ 24). After adjustment in multivariable analysis, MMSE ⩽ 24 had an odds ratio for poor-quality spirometry of 1.33 (95% CI = 0.78-2.28) in the BELFRAIL and 1.30 (95% CI = 0.88-1.91) in the CRYSTAL cohort.

CONCLUSIONS:

In community-dwelling older adults, including those over 80 years old, impaired cognition measured by the MMSE may not be an independent predictor of poor-quality spirometry. Further research is needed in this area, and spirometry should be used more often in older adults in primary care.

PMID:
26201999
PMCID:
PMC4532161
DOI:
10.1038/npjpcrm.2015.48
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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