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PLoS One. 2015 Jul 22;10(7):e0133490. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133490. eCollection 2015.

Asthma Is More Severe in Older Adults.

Author information

1
Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America.
2
Department of Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America.
3
Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America.
4
Department of Medicine, The University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, United States of America.
6
Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America.
7
The National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.
9
Pulmonary Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachussets, United States of America.
10
Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America.
11
Asthma Institute, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
12
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University-MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America.
13
Department of Pediatric, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America.
14
Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America; Department of Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Severe asthma occurs more often in older adult patients. We hypothesized that the greater risk for severe asthma in older individuals is due to aging, and is independent of asthma duration.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional study of prospectively collected data from adult participants (N=1130; 454 with severe asthma) enrolled from 2002 - 2011 in the Severe Asthma Research Program.

RESULTS:

The association between age and the probability of severe asthma, which was performed by applying a Locally Weighted Scatterplot Smoother, revealed an inflection point at age 45 for risk of severe asthma. The probability of severe asthma increased with each year of life until 45 years and thereafter increased at a much slower rate. Asthma duration also increased the probability of severe asthma but had less effect than aging. After adjustment for most comorbidities of aging and for asthma duration using logistic regression, asthmatics older than 45 maintained the greater probability of severe asthma [OR: 2.73 (95 CI: 1.96; 3.81)]. After 45, the age-related risk of severe asthma continued to increase in men, but not in women.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, the impact of age and asthma duration on risk for asthma severity in men and women is greatest over times of 18-45 years of age; age has a greater effect than asthma duration on risk of severe asthma.

PMID:
26200463
PMCID:
PMC4511639
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0133490
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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