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Ageing Res Rev. 2015 Nov;24(Pt A):83-97. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2015.07.005. Epub 2015 Jul 19.

DAMPs and influenza virus infection in ageing.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, NUS Immunology Program, Centre for Life Sciences, National University Health System (NUHS), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 117456, Singapore.
2
Department of Physiology, NUS Immunology Program, Centre for Life Sciences, National University Health System (NUHS), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 117456, Singapore. Electronic address: lina_lim@nuhs.edu.sg.

Abstract

Influenza A virus (IAV) is a serious global health problem worldwide due to frequent and severe outbreaks. IAV causes significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population, due to the ineffectiveness of the vaccine and the alteration of T cell immunity with ageing. The cellular and molecular link between ageing and virus infection is unclear and it is possible that damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) may play a role in the raised severity and susceptibility of virus infections in the elderly. DAMPs which are released from damaged cells following activation, injury or cell death can activate the immune response through the stimulation of the inflammasome through several types of receptors found on the plasma membrane, inside endosomes after endocytosis as well as in the cytosol. In this review, the detriment in the immune system during ageing and the links between influenza virus infection and ageing will be discussed. In addition, the role of DAMPs such as HMGB1 and S100/Annexin in ageing, and the enhanced morbidity and mortality to severe influenza infection in ageing will be highlighted.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Alarmins; DAMPs; Influenza A virus; Nuclear factor kappa B; Pro-inflammatory cytokines; Toll-like receptors

PMID:
26200296
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2015.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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