Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mult Scler. 2016 Mar;22(3):385-8. doi: 10.1177/1352458515595876. Epub 2015 Jul 21.

Viral exposures and MS outcome in a prospective cohort of children with acquired demyelination.

Author information

1
Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, USA naila.makhani@yale.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania, USA.
3
Departments of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Canada.
4
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Canada.
5
Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
6
Calamba Doctors' Hospital, Philippines.
7
Montreal Neurological Institute and McGill University, Canada.
8
Division of Neurology and Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Canada.
9
Departments of Internal Medicine and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with increased multiple sclerosis (MS) risk. Recently, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been proposed as a protective factor against MS development. We determined EBV, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus and CMV seroprevalence in 247 prospectively followed children with acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS). Remote EBV infection was more common in children with MS than those with monophasic ADS while CMV infection was more common in children with monophasic ADS. Children displaying evidence of remote EBV without CMV infection were at highest risk of subsequent MS diagnosis. Viral infection repertoire detected at ADS provides important prognostic information.

KEYWORDS:

Epstein–Barr virus; Multiple sclerosis; cytomegalovirus; pediatric; risk factors

PMID:
26199356
DOI:
10.1177/1352458515595876
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center