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J Nat Prod. 2015 Aug 28;78(8):1799-808. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00246. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

Vanillic Acid Inhibits Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting Neutrophil Recruitment, Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production, and NFκB Activation in Mice.

Author information

1
Departamento de Ciências Patológicas, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina , 86057970 Londrina, Brazil.
2
Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Centro de Ciências de Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Londrina , 86039440 Londrina, Brazil.

Abstract

Vanillic acid (1) is a flavoring agent found in edible plants and fruits. It is an oxidized form of vanillin. Phenolic compounds form a substantial part of plant foods used as antioxidants with beneficial biological activities. These compounds have received considerable attention because of their role in preventing human diseases. Especially, 1 presents antibacterial, antimicrobial, and chemopreventive effects. However, the mechanisms by which 1 exerts its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo are incompletely understood. Thus, the effect of 1 was evaluated in murine models of inflammatory pain. Treatment with 1 inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone, the second phase of the formalin test, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Treatment with 1 also inhibited carrageenan- and CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of 1 involved the inhibition of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and NFκB activation in the carrageenan model. The present study demonstrated 1 presents analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in a wide range of murine inflammation models, and its mechanisms of action involves antioxidant effects and NFκB-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

PMID:
26192250
DOI:
10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00246
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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