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Rehabil Psychol. 2015 Aug;60(3):254-62. doi: 10.1037/rep0000045. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

Beyond depression: Predictors of self-reported cognitive function in adults living with MS.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between self-reported cognition and demographic/psychosocial variables in individuals with a self-reported diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS).

DESIGN:

Secondary longitudinal analysis of mailed self-report surveys over a period of 2 years.

SETTING:

Community.

PARTICIPANTS:

407 community-dwelling individuals from the Pacific Northwest with a self-reported diagnosis of MS.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Subjective general cognitive concerns and subjective executive difficulties as measured by the Neuro-QOL Applied Cognition-Executive Function-Short Form (SF) and the Applied Cognition-General Concerns-SF.

RESULTS:

Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify statistically significant longitudinal predictors of perceived cognitive difficulties 2 years later. Fatigue and anxiety were statistically significant predictors of general cognitive concerns. Fatigue and perceived stress were statistically significant predictors of perceived executive difficulties. Fatigue was the strongest predictor in both models.

CONCLUSIONS:

In MS, perceived cognitive impairment is frequently linked to depression without consideration of other possible contributors. This study suggests that in people with MS, fatigue is a stronger predictor of self-reported cognitive function 2 years later than depression.

PMID:
26192051
PMCID:
PMC4564347
DOI:
10.1037/rep0000045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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