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Cell Metab. 2015 Sep 1;22(3):408-17. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2015.06.011. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Transplanted Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Contribute to Human Adipogenesis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine (H7), Karolinska Institutet, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: mikael.ryden@ki.se.
2
Department of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology (C5), Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Gene Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Biotechnology, 171 65 Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Medicine (H7), Karolinska Institutet, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Department of Laboratory Medicine (H5), Karolinska Institutet, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Institut Camille Jordan, CNRS UMR 5208, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne, France.

Abstract

Because human white adipocytes display a high turnover throughout adulthood, a continuous supply of precursor cells is required to maintain adipogenesis. Bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells may contribute to mammalian adipogenesis; however, results in animal models are conflicting. Here we demonstrate in 65 subjects who underwent allogeneic BM or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation that, over the entire lifespan, BM/PBSC-derived progenitor cells contribute ∼10% to the subcutaneous adipocyte population. While this is independent of gender, age, and different transplantation-related parameters, body fat mass exerts a strong influence, with up to 2.5-fold increased donor cell contribution in obese individuals. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of single adipocytes suggests that BM/PBSC-derived progenitors contribute to adipose tissue via both differentiation and cell fusion. Thus, at least in the setting of transplantation, BM serves as a reservoir for adipocyte progenitors, particularly in obese subjects.

PMID:
26190649
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2015.06.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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