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Semin Speech Lang. 2015 Aug;36(3):209-14. doi: 10.1055/s-0035-1554802. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Join the Revolution: How Montessori for Aging and Dementia can Change Long-Term Care Culture.

Author information

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
2
Brush Development, Chardon, Ohio.
3
Dementiability Enterprises, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
4
Montessori Aged Support Services, Australia.

Abstract

Efforts to improve the quality of life of persons with dementia in long-term care through the implementation of various approaches to person-centered care have been underway for the past two decades. Studies have yielded conflicting reports evaluating the evidence for these approaches. The purpose of this article is to outline the findings of several systematic reviews of this literature, highlighting the areas of improvement needs, and to describe a new person-centered care model, DementiAbility Methods: The Montessori Way. This model focuses on the abilities, needs, interests, and strengths of the person and creating worthwhile and meaningful roles, routines, and activities for the person within a supportive physical environment. This is accomplished through gaining the commitment of the facility's leaders, training staff, and monitoring program implementation. The potential for a culture change in long-term care environments is dependent on the development and rigorous evaluation of person-centered care approaches.

PMID:
26190512
DOI:
10.1055/s-0035-1554802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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