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Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2015 Sep;29(3):539-55. doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2015.05.002. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Recognition of and Prompt Treatment for Tick-Borne Infections in Children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, 50 North Dunlap Street, Memphis, TN 38103, USA; Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, 50 North Dunlap Street, Memphis, TN 38103, USA. Electronic address: sbucking@uthsc.edu.

Abstract

Tick-borne infections create diagnostic challenges because they tend to present with nonspecific findings. Because clinicians often fail to recognize tick-borne illnesses in early stages, therapy is frequently delayed or omitted. This is especially problematic for rickettsial infections (Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis), because the risk of long-term morbidity and mortality increases with delayed treatment. We emphasize the need for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for tick-borne infections; to diagnose these illnesses presumptively, without waiting for confirmatory laboratory test results; and to promptly start therapy with doxycycline, even in young children, when rickettsial infections are suspected.

KEYWORDS:

Anaplasmosis; Babesiosis; Doxycycline; Ehrlichiosis; Lyme disease; Rocky Mountain spotted fever; Tick-borne infections; Tularemia

PMID:
26188606
DOI:
10.1016/j.idc.2015.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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