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J Immunol. 2015 Aug 1;195(3):755-61. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1500751.

Chimeric Antigen Receptor- and TCR-Modified T Cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street.

Author information

1
Division of Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104;
2
Division of Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104; and.
3
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104; and Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 cjune@exchange.upenn.edu.

Abstract

The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)- and TCR-engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and it holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology, and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. In this overview, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT.

PMID:
26188068
PMCID:
PMC4507286
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1500751
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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