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Science. 2015 Aug 21;349(6250):860-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa8764. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

PLANT MICROBIOME. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root microbiome by specific bacterial taxa.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0845, USA. Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. slebeis@utk.edu dangl@email.unc.edu.
2
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA.
3
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA.
4
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA.
5
Joint Genome Institute, U.S. Department of Energy, Walnut Creek, CA, USA.
6
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA.
7
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280, USA. slebeis@utk.edu dangl@email.unc.edu.

Abstract

Immune systems distinguish "self" from "nonself" to maintain homeostasis and must differentially gate access to allow colonization by potentially beneficial, nonpathogenic microbes. Plant roots grow within extremely diverse soil microbial communities but assemble a taxonomically limited root-associated microbiome. We grew isogenic Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered immune systems in a wild soil and also in recolonization experiments with a synthetic bacterial community. We established that biosynthesis of, and signaling dependent on, the foliar defense phytohormone salicylic acid is required to assemble a normal root microbiome. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root by specific bacterial families. Thus, plant immune signaling drives selection from the available microbial communities to sculpt the root microbiome.

PMID:
26184915
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaa8764
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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