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Ann Neurol. 2015 Nov;78(5):824-30. doi: 10.1002/ana.24481. Epub 2015 Aug 25.

Post-Mortem evaluation of amyloid-dopamine terminal positron emission tomography dementia classifications.

Author information

1
Neurology Service & GRECC, VAAAHS, Ann Arbor, MI.
2
Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
3
Michigan Alzheimer's Disease Center, Ann Arbor, MI.
4
University of Michigan Morris K. Udall Center of Excellent for Parkinson's Disease Research, Ann Arbor, MI.
5
Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
6
Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Abstract

Clinical classification of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is imprecise. We reported previously that molecular imaging classification of early dementia and MCI with dual amyloid and dopamine terminal positron emission tomography differs significantly from expert clinical classification. We now report pathological diagnoses in a substantial subset of our previously imaged subjects. Among 36 subjects coming to autopsy, imaging classifications and pathological diagnosis were concordant in 33 cases (κ = 0.85). This approach enhanced specificity of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. The strong concordance of imaging-based classifications and pathological diagnoses suggests that this imaging approach will be useful in establishing more accurate and convenient classification biomarkers for dementia research.

PMID:
26183692
PMCID:
PMC4836870
DOI:
10.1002/ana.24481
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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