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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Oct;104(10):974-86. doi: 10.1111/apa.13128.

Postnatal growth in preterm infants and later health outcomes: a systematic review.

Author information

1
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
2
Institute of Child Health, UCL, London, UK.
3
Nestlé Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
DSM-Martek Division, Dundee, UK.
5
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit and NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK.
6
University of Munich, München, Germany.
7
Formerly ILSI Europe, Brussels, Belgium.
8
Metabolic Research Laboratories, Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
9
Abbott Nutrition, Granada, Spain.
10
Mead Johnson Pediatric Nutrition Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
11
Nutricia Research, Danone Nutricia Early Life Nutrition, Singapore, Singapore.
12
University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

In preterm infants, poor postnatal growth is associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes; conversely, rapid postnatal growth is supposedly harmful for future development of metabolic diseases.

CONCLUSION:

In this systematic review, observational studies reported consistent positive associations between postnatal weight or head growth and neurocognitive outcomes; however, there was limited evidence from the few intervention studies. Evidence linking postnatal weight gain to later adiposity and other cardiovascular disease risk factors in preterm infants was also limited.

KEYWORDS:

Feeding; Growth velocity; Health; Postnatal; Preterm newborn

PMID:
26179961
PMCID:
PMC5054880
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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