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Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2015 Oct;98(4):381-6. doi: 10.1002/cpt.186. Epub 2015 Aug 21.

Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to develop novel therapies for HIV.

Author information

1
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
National Laboratory for HIV Immunology, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada.
3
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
4
Department of Medicine Solna, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
5
Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

Despite the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which delays and/or prevents AIDS pathogenesis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals continue to face increased morbidities and mortality rates compared with uninfected individuals. Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal dysfunction is a key feature of HIV infection, and is associated with mortality. In this study, we review current knowledge about mucosal dysfunction in HIV infection, and describe potential avenues for therapeutic targets to enhance mucosal function and decrease morbidities and mortalities in HIV-infected individuals.

PMID:
26179624
DOI:
10.1002/cpt.186
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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