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Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc. 2015 Jul-Aug;53(4):484-8.

[Evolution of contrast nephropathy in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention].

[Article in Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the publisher]

Author information

1
Hospital de Especialidades Centro Médico Nacional La Raza,Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Distrito Federal, México. dra-bibi@hotmail.com.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

INTRODUCTION:

Current epidemiological transition from infectious to chronic-degenerative diseases is more and more demanding procedures requiring contrast medium, which turns out to be a risk factor for acute renal major damage in patients with chronic kidney disease. The aim of this article is to describe the frequency and evolution of Contrast-induced nephropathy in ambulatory patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

METHODS:

We included patients with renal damage at the time of exposure to the contrast medium. They took a risk and were adjusted prevention measures follow at 48 hrs. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics.

RESULTS:

From 1236 cardiac catheterization procedure performed, 32 patients met the inclusion criteria. The 96.87% had chronic degenerative diseases such as diabetes or hypertension, overweight and obesity were a constant in 65.62% of cases, in 21.7% of patients the contrast dose was slightly higher than recommended. The 6.3% developed contrast-induced nephropathy with elevated creatinine greater than 25% at 48 hours after the procedure, despite preventive measures, however none of them required renal replacement.

CONCLUSIONS:

The frequency of contrast medium-induced nephropathy in patients with high risk factors was lower than that reported in the literature; this may correspond to that in all cases nephrology assessment was performed before the procedure.

KEYWORDS:

Acute kidney injury; Contrast nephropathy; Coronary angiography

PMID:
26177437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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