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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2015 Nov;115(11):2357-65. doi: 10.1007/s00421-015-3215-8. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

New Zealand blackcurrant extract improves cycling performance and fat oxidation in cyclists.

Author information

1
Department of Sport & Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, College Lane, Chichester, PO19 6PE, UK.
2
Department of Sport & Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, College Lane, Chichester, PO19 6PE, UK. m.willems@chi.ac.uk.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Blackcurrant intake increases peripheral blood flow in humans, potentially by anthocyanin-induced vasodilation which may affect substrate delivery and exercise performance. We examined the effects of New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract on substrate oxidation, cycling time-trial performance and plasma lactate responses following the time-trial in trained cyclists.

METHODS:

Using a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, 14 healthy men (age: 38 ± 13 years, height: 178 ± 4 cm, body mass: 77 ± 9 kg, VO2max: 53 ± 6 mL kg(-1) min(-1), mean ± SD) ingested NZBC extract (300 mg day(-1) CurraNZ™ containing 105 mg anthocyanin) or placebo (PL, 300 mg microcrystalline cellulose M102) for 7 days (washout 14 days). On day 7, participants performed 30 min of cycling (3 × 10 min at 45, 55 and 65 % VO2max), followed by a 16.1 km time-trial with lactate sampling during a 20-min passive recovery.

RESULTS:

NZBC extract increased fat oxidation at 65 % VO2max by 27 % (P < 0.05) and improved 16.1 km time-trial performance by 2.4 % (NZBC: 1678 ± 108 s, PL: 1722 ± 131 s, P < 0.05). Plasma lactate was higher with NZBC extract immediately following the time-trial (NZBC: 7.06 ± 1.73 mmol L(-1), PL: 5.92 ± 1.58 mmol L(-1), P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Seven-day intake of New Zealand blackcurrant extract improves 16.1 km cycling time-trial performance and increases fat oxidation during moderate intensity cycling.

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanin; Indirect calorimetry; Lactate; New Zealand blackcurrant; Recovery; Sports nutrition; Substrate oxidation; Time-trial

PMID:
26175097
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-015-3215-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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