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Acta Paediatr. 2015 Oct;104(10):e455-9. doi: 10.1111/apa.13120. Epub 2015 Sep 2.

Physical activity and screen-time of childhood haematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors.

Author information

1
School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
NSW Cancer Survivors Centre, Randwick, NSW, Australia.
3
Children's Hospital Institute of Sports Medicine, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia.
4
Department of Oncology, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia.
5
Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Sydney Medical Program, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
6
Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia.
7
Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
8
Prevention Research Collaboration, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
9
School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.

Abstract

AIM:

Reduced bone mineral density, impaired cardiovascular fitness and increased risk of obesity are well-known late effects of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in survivors of childhood cancer. These comorbidities can be mitigated through physical activity and limiting screen-time (ST). This study aims to increase the understanding of physical activity and ST behaviours for children following HSCT.

METHODS:

Children were recruited from two oncology follow-up clinics and completed a questionnaire on their physical activity levels and screen-time. Children were classified as short (≤2 years) and long-term (>2 years) survivors.

RESULTS:

Fifty-eight children were eligible, of whom forty children of age 6-18 years (60% males) participated in the study. Less than half (47.5%) met the daily recommendations for physical activity and one-third met the ST recommendations. Late survivors reported higher daily physical activity and less ST than early survivors. Among late survivors, females reported higher daily physical activity and less ST than males.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that the majority of children following HSCT were not sufficiently active and had excessive screen-time; however, this was comparable to healthy populations. Appropriately designed physical activity and screen-time intervention programmes should be explored early following transplant for children undergoing HSCT.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer children; HSCT; Physical activity; Screen-time

PMID:
26174593
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13120
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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