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Clin Biochem. 2016 Mar;49(4-5):363-76. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2015.07.016. Epub 2015 Jul 11.

Genetic polymorphisms in the immune response: A focus on kidney transplantation.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Chemical Carcinogenesis and Pharmacogenetics, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
2
Inserm, UMR 850, F-87000 Limoges, France; CHU Limoges, Service de Pharmacologie, Toxicologie et Pharmacovigilance, F-87042 Limoges, France.
3
Inserm, UMR 850, F-87000 Limoges, France; CHU Limoges, Service de Pharmacologie, Toxicologie et Pharmacovigilance, F-87042 Limoges, France; Univ. Limoges, Faculté of Pharmacie, Service de Pharmacologie, F-87025 Limoges, France. Electronic address: nicolas.picard@unilim.fr.

Abstract

The modulation of the immune system following solid organ transplantation has made considerable progress with new immunosuppressive regimens and has considerably improved rejections rates. The improvement in long-term allograft survival is, however, modest. A complex network of cytokines, chemokines, adhesion, activation and co-stimulatory molecules are the frontline contributors to allograft rejection, which in turn determines the evolution of graft function and its long-term survival. Polymorphisms in these genes influence protein levels and presumably their signaling effects. In this review, we present a relevant panel of candidate genes related to the immune system in the context of solid organ transplantation; we discuss the most convincing reports of genetic associations with outcomes in renal transplantation and highlight the most promising loci among the vast body of literature.

KEYWORDS:

Cytokines; Gene polymorphism; Immune response; Immunosuppressive therapy; Transplantation

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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