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Neuropsychopharmacology. 2016 Feb;41(3):811-21. doi: 10.1038/npp.2015.207. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Dampened Mesolimbic Dopamine Function and Signaling by Saturated but not Monounsaturated Dietary Lipids.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche du CHUM and Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montreal, QC, Canada.
2
Department of Physiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
3
Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
5
Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.
6
Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

Overconsumption of dietary fat is increasingly linked with motivational and emotional impairments. Human and animal studies demonstrate associations between obesity and blunted reward function at the behavioral and neural level, but it is unclear to what degree such changes are a consequence of an obese state and whether they are contingent on dietary lipid class. We sought to determine the impact of prolonged ad libitum intake of diets rich in saturated or monounsaturated fat, separate from metabolic signals associated with increased adiposity, on dopamine (DA)-dependent behaviors and to identify pertinent signaling changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Male rats fed a saturated (palm oil), but not an isocaloric monounsaturated (olive oil), high-fat diet exhibited decreased sensitivity to the rewarding (place preference) and locomotor-sensitizing effects of amphetamine as compared with low-fat diet controls. Blunted amphetamine action by saturated high-fat feeding was entirely independent of caloric intake, weight gain, and plasma levels of leptin, insulin, and glucose and was accompanied by biochemical and behavioral evidence of reduced D1R signaling in the NAc. Saturated high-fat feeding was also tied to protein markers of increased AMPA receptor-mediated plasticity and decreased DA transporter expression in the NAc but not to alterations in DA turnover and biosynthesis. Collectively, the results suggest that intake of saturated lipids can suppress DA signaling apart from increases in body weight and adiposity-related signals known to affect mesolimbic DA function, in part by diminishing D1 receptor signaling, and that equivalent intake of monounsaturated dietary fat protects against such changes.

PMID:
26171719
PMCID:
PMC4707827
DOI:
10.1038/npp.2015.207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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