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Surg Infect (Larchmt). 2015 Oct;16(5):588-94. doi: 10.1089/sur.2014.072. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Association between Triclosan-Coated Sutures for Abdominal Wall Closure and Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Open Surgery in Patients Presenting with Fecal Peritonitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Author information

1
1 Department of Surgery, Coloproctology Unit, General University Hospital Elche , Alicante, Spain .
2
2 Department of Surgery, Coloproctology Unit, University Hospital Son Espases , Mallorca, Spain .
3
3 Department of Surgery, Coloproctology Unit, University Hospital Ramon y Cajal , Madrid, Spain .
4
4 Department of Surgical Nursery, Hospital del Sureste , Madrid, Spain .

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A factor that may influence the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) is the suture used for closure of the abdominal wall because bacteria may adhere to the suture material. Sutures can be coated with antibacterial substances that may reduce the bacterial load in the incision.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of triclosan-coated sutures used in abdominal wall closure in patients with fecal peritonitis.

METHODS:

A randomized study was performed. Inclusion criteria were intra-operative diagnosis of fecal peritonitis secondary to acute diverticulitis perforation, neoplastic tumor perforation, or colorectal anastomotic leak of previous elective colorectal resection. The patients were randomly assigned to either abdominal wall closure with triclosan-coated sutures (group 1) or sutures without triclosan (group 2).

RESULTS:

Fifty patients were included in group 1 and 51 in group 2. The incisional SSI rate was 10% in group 1 and 35.3% in group 2 (p=0.004; odds ratio [OR]=0.204; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069-0.605). A significant reduction in SSIs caused by Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis was observed in group 2.

CONCLUSION:

The use of triclosan-coated sutures in fecal peritonitis surgery reduces the incidence of incisional SSI.

PMID:
26171624
DOI:
10.1089/sur.2014.072
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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